deteriorating conversations: to protect and serve

Recently I’ve been pondering the attitudes that I’ve observed and absorbed about the police and the relationship between people of color and police.  Living where I live, I have very little contact with the police – unless the Mustang lulls me into speeding (and I get caught).  Even though my uncle is a policeman, and I’ve had friends on the force, I don’t generally trust cops.  I never really have.  The institution seems to perpetuate the subjugation of people of color, no matter the race of the officers.

There are stories upon stories of police brutality – even killings – and even though these stories really are a minority, harassment is common.  I know that a lot of people who end up in a life of crime have experienced disadvantages that increase the likelihood that they’ll choose that path, and I can sympathize with that in the abstract.  I’ve never really had to exit my abstractions since I haven’t been so closely touched by crime.  [Certainly, the recent theft of all my music was big to me, but in the grand scheme of things – itty bitty.]

Take the recent story of Aiyana Jones.  Awful police mistake ending in the loss of a 7 yr old.  There really wasn’t enough coverage of the story (surmise your own reasons why), but the coverage that I saw generally discussed Aiyana, the police, and/or the reality tv show that was filming the officers involved.  It was much more rare to run across an article that discussed the impetus for the investigation: the murder of a 17 yr old named Jerean Blake.  It seems the perp was in a relationship with Aiyana’s aunt who lived upstairs (in a separate unit).  Both killings were senseless.

Maybe it wouldn’t have been possible for the police to protect Jerean.  But shouldn’t they have?

And I certainly feel for Aiyana’s family, but what of the scum that chose to kill a kid for looking at him?  In a broader view, what of the kids who choose to join gangs and end up being perps and victims themselves?

Having been placed a lot closer to observing violence in the last couple weeks, I was starkly awakened to the fact that this type of crime [senseless killings] is just as much terrorism as anything mounted by Al Qaeda.  Not that we need completely militaristic methods for deterrents – I’m not even sure that works.

It’s complicated.  We need cops.  But what is it about the justice system that skews the serving and protecting to certain neighborhoods, and the arresting toward other neighborhoods?

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nothing but the ice

I’ve been mulling over a lot in the last few weeks.  Life is happening, and I’m still kickin’, but I’m battling some severe apathy right now.  Sometimes it gets like that, and I’m not sure if it’s fatigue-related or what, but here I am.

Right now, I’m thinking about how teeth-grittingly peeved I was when I read this.  Commentary from here to there echoed many of my thoughts, and I just wanted to watch dancing shows and not think about it.  (And of course, this means I have the joy of knowing that Susie‘s gone, even though I kinda started to feel sorry for her at the end.  Eh.  I did not like her.  Her dancing was all over the place.)

My point?  I just knew R. Kelly was finally going to jail.  He was on freaking video, y’all.  I didn’t watch the vid, but a friend of mine sent me the stills back whenever they first broke [forgetting that I in NO way wanted to see them].  I’m a believer in the idea of innocent until proven guilty.  But when the defense says to me – “who you gonna believe? Us or your lying eyes?”  I choose my eyes.

Video is a powerful exhibit.  I thought it’d be enough.  I should’ve known better.

When you come out and call yourself something like the Pied Piper, I start thinking that you’re just laughing about getting away with murder child rape.  The story of the Pied Piper is one about how a grown man takes advantage of selfish/ignorant parents and lures children into a situation they think is wonderful, but in reality removes them from their homes and families forever.  Tell me again how that’s not making a mockery of this situation?

Those that have the gall to come up with some victim-blaming excuses are inexcusable, in my book.  This girl was thirteen (13!) at the time the video was shot.  Over and over, though, it comes down to the woman’s responsibility to shut a man down for any type of sexual abuse.

It makes me tired.

And I wasn’t looking for much.
Just. ice.